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There Is A Reason, Turn, Turn, Turn

Team Mojarto Last Updated On : 16th May 2020

The show ‘Resurgence’ that opened online on April 21 by the Tarq Gallery is a rich amalgamation of works that give us an insight into the larger picture of the shifting realities of our world today

As most artists at this time are turning to their work for answers, we, in turn, turn to shows like these online, that puts together the artists’ vision as well as balances the angst of being confined with nature’s gradual recovery. Moving across mediums, visual languages and more – the show ‘Resurgence’ exhibits works that ‘look at ideas of environmental degradation, healing in both urban and rural spaces, while acknowledging the stillness and uncertainty that surrounds us’. The exhibition features one work each by artists Apnavi Makanji, Aaditi Joshi, Clare Arni, Nibha Sikander, Parag Tandel, Ronny Sen, Sameer Kulavoor, Savia Mahajan, and Soghra Khurasani

Sameer Kulavoor, Blued 3, 2019, Screen-print on paper, 13.7ʺ x 22ʺ, Edition 10 of 15

Using the current atmosphere of turmoil, conflict, power and reflections of both the macro and micro, the show is meant to prod the viewer’s wandering eye to look at the way our landscape is changing so quickly without our interference. Using the beautifully corroded yet breathing texture of paper clay, Savia Mahajan’s work ‘Lithified lives 12’ literally speaks volumes as it emulates a piece of wood that may very well have remained after a forest fire. Years of coagulated coal and ash or even layered rings of a charred tree showcase the effort that nature often puts in the hopes of a better future and how easily her own power can destroy the same.

Soghra Khurasani, Skin VIII, 2018, Woodcut print on paper, 19.3ʺ x 24ʺ, Edition 3 of 3

Soghra Khurasani, Skin VIII, 2018, Woodcut print on paper, 19.3ʺ x 24ʺ, Edition 3 of 3

Soghra Khusrani’s Skin VIII calls on the tactile texture of woodcut and the grains of cells in skin that often seem to appear and disappear. The colourful but lush waves are layered against this grain as though reflecting the mood changes and the exquisite patterns of our own thoughts. It could conversely be the reflection of the blossoming colours of nature and spring at this time, showing us a hint of its majesty through our windows.

Clare Arni, Untitled, Bijapur, 2008, Digital print on canvas 17ʺ x 12ʺ, Edition of 10

Clare Arni, Untitled, Bijapur, 2008, Digital print on canvas 17ʺ x 12ʺ, Edition of 10

‘While the virus is consuming our screens and social media, we wanted to focus on the state of the world with humans temporarily taken out of the equation. It is interesting to see nature feeling free to finally breathe again, from more birds chirping to spotting dolphins, to cleaner air. At the same time, we are aware of the grave consequences the global shut down will have on the economy at large, and especially on already disadvantaged communities all around the world,’ said the curatorial note.

Parag Tandel, Coast is Clear, Autopolisphilia Series #6, 2020, Graphite & archival ink on archival paper, 18ʺ x 12ʺ.

Parag Tandel, Coast is Clear, Autopolisphilia Series #6, 2020, Graphite & archival ink on archival paper, 18ʺ x 12ʺ.

And Resurgence does exactly that, as each of the works that are a part of this exhibition are meant to be an insight into the larger picture. Our very tangible realities have become blurred and without structure, and the exhibit hopes to display some of that uncertainty and duality.

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